Mass Incarceration

Riley Evans uncovers how the commercial bail bonds industry produces human suffering in pursuit of corporate greed. It’s a story of a saloon in San Francisco and a multi-national insurer in Tokyo. It’s a story of campaign donations, complicit judges and

Connie Cheng’s powerful new article on The [F]law examines how electronic ankle monitoring, like other alternatives to detention, is billed as more humane. But a closer look reveals that corporations are still in control and immigrants are still not free.

Join this week’s “Systemic Lawyering in Times of Crisis” Webinar at:  https://harvard.zoom.us/j/770662864.   This week’s session, Tuesday April 21 at 12pm EST, focuses on the criminal legal system and features the following panelists: Judge Nancy Gertner, Senior Lecturer at Harvard

The video for the second session, held on April 7th, is now available, featuring: Esme Caramello: Clinical Professor of Law and Faculty Director of Harvard Legal Aid Bureau, Harvard Law School Joey Longley: Equal Justice Works Fellow at ACLU National Prison Project

This week there will be two sessions of the “Systemic Lawyering in Times of Crisis” Webinar. The series features systemically oriented lawyers and activists in fields most affected by our latest crisis. Each session examines the special challenges posed by the crisis, the pressing needs, the

Great news from two friends of the Systemic Justice Project: A small city bordering Ferguson, Mo., has agreed to pay $4.7 million to compensate nearly 2,000 people who spent time in the city’s jail for not paying fines and fees

Whitney Benns, a friend of the Systemic Justice Project and Justice Fellow has a fantastic piece in The Atlantic on forced labor in the Louisiana State Penitentiary. After describing scenes that are virtually unchanged from antebellum slavery, including especially the race

From the Frontier Torts Project: Solitary Confined: The Case for a Frontier Tort Executive Summary A prisoner living in long-term solitary confinement in the United States typically spends twenty-three hours alone each day in a six-foot by nine-foot cell. Everything