Antitrust & Anticorruption

Underpaid? And overpaying for everything from food and health care to beer and concert tickets? Luke Hinrichs reports on the costs of market concentration — and how antitrust needs to be reinvigorated to help dampen corporate power. Read the article

Connie Cheng’s powerful new article on The [F]law examines how electronic ankle monitoring, like other alternatives to detention, is billed as more humane. But a closer look reveals that corporations are still in control and immigrants are still not free.

Shao Chan’s excellent new article on The [F]law examines how Uber and Lyft are racing to the bottom to redefine work.  Read the article here. Related article on The [F]law: Julio Colby, Brave New Work: The Resurgence of Organized Labor

Adriel Williams’s  powerful new article on The [F]law looks at how prison telecommunications company Securus tears families apart with its astronomically high fees and costs. One million incarcerated people must use Securus products to call and email their families, but

The definition of corruption underwent a change beginning in the 1960s. This change was catalyzed by economists’ hostility towards government regulation. That hostility translated into a bifurcated conception of corruption: public corruption (which ought to be prosecuted) and