Inequality

From donating millions to charity to, literally, aiming for the stars, corporations claim to save the world in a variety of ways. But what happens when we look beyond that thin layer of altruism? Tyler Price looks behind the mask

Jon Hanson & Jacob Lipton, the co-founders of the Systemic Justice Project, have recently published their article, Occupy Justice: Introducing the Injustice Framework in Volume 15 of The Harvard Law & Policy Review. You can download the article on SSRN and

Join this week’s “Systemic Lawyering in Times of Crisis” Webinar at:  https://harvard.zoom.us/j/770662864.   This week’s session (Tuesday, April 28, at 12pm EST) will focus on economic inequity in the time of COVID-19. Participants include: Chiraayu Gosrani, NYU Law ’22 Alyssa Peterson,

From one of our systemic justice students, here is an illuminating website briefly describing capital punishment in America, focusing in particular in how inadequate representation disadvantages a large number of capital defendants and skews the system against them.  Included is

The Systemic Justice Project is co-sponsoring the Harvard Kennedy School Conference on Poverty and Inequality. For more information, see below: On behalf of our conference planning committee, we’d like to invite you to the Conference on Poverty & Inequality. In light of

Great news from two friends of the Systemic Justice Project: A small city bordering Ferguson, Mo., has agreed to pay $4.7 million to compensate nearly 2,000 people who spent time in the city’s jail for not paying fines and fees

Systemic Justice Project friend, Jay Willis, has recently been writing with insight and wit about the problem of homelessness.  This week, he published the following op-ed in Crosscut.  *** In Seattle, the recent explosion in homelessness has transformed the issue into